Wealth of Ideas Blog

Who Pays for All Those Illegal Music Downloads?

Music publisher BMG Rights Management could not sue each of the thousands (maybe even millions) of downloaders who infringed the company’s copyrights, so it sued the company that provided the downloads. A jury in DC just ruled that Cox Communications, a regional Internet provider, must pay BMG $25 million for permitting free musical downloads by its subscribers.

Copyright Infringer Gets Three Years!

Rocky Ouprasith pled guilty to one count of criminal copyright infringement, and was sentenced to three years in prison. Ouch! Now before you get too sympathetic, Rocky did not copy a Wikipedia article for a high school term paper. Who hasn’t done that?

Through his RockDizMusic.com website, Rocky reproduced and distributed millions of copyrighted songs! Millions! Do they let inmates listen to music at Club Fed?

Give Me a “C.” Give Me an “O.” Give Me a “P.”

The Sixth Circuit Court let stand a previous ruling that cheerleader outfits are eligible for copyright protection. The case was brought by Varsity Brands back in 2010 when it claimed that its competitor, Star Athletica, had copied several of its cheerleader uniform designs. Push ‘em back, push ‘em back, waaaay back!

The Jury Rules for Three Cents a Minute

A jury of 12 good persons and true granted Ultratec $5.4 million in damages for infringement of its closed-caption telephone patent. What is interesting is how the jury came up with $5.4 million. In its decision, the jury rejected a one-time lump sum payment to the plaintiff and decided on a per-minute royalty fee of three cents a minute.

Jay Z Dodges the Bullet

Shawn Carter (aka Jay Z) is a free man after a California federal judge dismissed the copyright infringement lawsuit filed against him for allegedly lifting music from a 1957 ballad, “Khosara,” by Egyptian artist Baligh Hamy for his song “Big Pimpin’”. The case was brought by Mr. Hamdy’s nephew, Osama Ahmed Fahmy. The judge dismissed the case against Jay Z and his producer, Timbaland, ruling that Mr.

Circuit Court Rules in Favor of the “Dancing Baby”

The U.S. Ninth Circuit Court just ruled that Universal Music should have first considered if the use of its copyrighted music was “fair use” before sending a takedown letter to Stephanie Lenz whose video of her baby dancing to “Let’s Go Crazy” by the artist formerly known as Prince went viral. Eight years ago, Ms.

“Happy Birthday” Copyright Is Not Valid

According to a California Federal District Court Judge, Warner Bros. (“That’s all folks!”) and its Chappell Music business unit do not own a valid copyright to “Happy Birthday to You.” The ruling was the result of a class action lawsuit that, according to the plaintiffs’ attorneys, puts the world’s most recognizable tune into the public domain. No ruling on who owns “That’s all folks!”

Chubby Checker Sues for Trademark Infringement over Cufflinks

First of all, Chubby Checker is apparently still alive, and we have the court documents to prove it. Ernest Evans (Chubby’s real name) has filed a trademark infringement lawsuit against Wirkin Stiffs, the manufacturer of a line of Chubby Checker cufflinks, and against Macy's, Nordstrom, Amazon.com and other resellers of the allegedly infringing cufflinks.